Ashlee Borkowski
/ Categories: HR & Benefits, Well-Being

Live Well, Work Well: January 2020

This month's issue discusses holiday dieting tips, holiday decoration safety and the benefits of omega-3 supplements.

Download the full version of this Live Well, Work Well Newsletter

Don’t Fall Into This New Year’s Resolution Trap

Historically, one of the top New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight. Unfortunately, many people look to fad diets and weight loss products to achieve their goals quickly. While fad diets may prove effective initially, research shows that many people don’t find long-term success with these types of diets.

Lasting Lifestyle Changes vs. Quick Fixes

Instead of setting a goal to lose weight fast this New Year’s, set a goal to lead a healthier lifestyle. Common lifestyle New Year’s resolutions include the following:

  • Exercise regularly—Aim to get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, and to do strength training exercises of major muscle groups at least twice a week.
  • Maintain a well-balanced, healthy diet—Try to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein-rich foods and healthy fats. Make it a goal to incorporate more fruits and veggies into your diet.
  • Increase the amount of sleep you get—One of the best ways to become healthier is to get enough sleep. Try to get at least seven hours of sleep, the expert-recommended amount, per night.

Set Yourself Up for Success

According to U.S. News & World Report, 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail. That’s why it’s so important to set yourself up for success when you’re choosing a resolution.

Regardless of what you choose as your New Year’s resolution, make sure it is a “SMART” goal—one that is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely—to increase the odds that you will stick to it.

It's National Blood Donor Month

Since 1970, National Blood Donor Month has been celebrated in January. Historically, the winter season is one of the most difficult times of the year to collect enough blood products and donations to meet patient needs. While “whole blood” donations are the most common, individuals can also make platelet, power red and plasma donations.

Donated blood is used for blood transfusions. Common scenarios in which blood transfusions are needed include the following:

  • Patients suffering from severe trauma following disasters and accidents
  • Patients receiving surgical treatments and some medical treatments, including cancer patients and patients with sickle cell disease

Making the decision to donate blood can help save a life, but not everyone is eligible to donate blood. Visit the American Red Cross’ website to see if you meet the requirements to safely donate blood.

This Superfood May Help Prevent Diabetes

According to a four-year study, consuming legumes (e.g., beans, lentils and peas) may help you prevent diabetes. The study tracked the health of over 3,300 patients who were at-risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, and found that those who consumed the most legumes were 35% less likely to develop diabetes.

The weekly legume serving average varied between 3.35 servings and less than half a serving. The study found that those who ate just one serving per week were 33% less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consumed less than one serving per week.

In addition to helping prevent Type 2 diabetes, legumes can help protect heart and brain health, promote a healthy weight and reduce the risk of cancer. For more information, contact your doctor.

 

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