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Tasteful Tip Tuesday: January 2020

Beware: New Year = New Fad Diets

Jan. 1 signals a new calendar year, and for many Americans, a “new year, new me” mentality. In fact, according to Business Insider, getting in shape is consistently the most popular New Year’s resolution in the United States. While making lifestyle changes, as approved by a doctor, is not a bad thing, turning to a fad diet to achieve a resolution of getting in shape is not ideal or healthy.

What’s a fad diet?

Fad diets typically promise quick weight loss, oftentimes through unhealthy and unbalanced dieting. A diet can be considered a fad if it:

  • Claims to help you lose more than 1-2 pounds per week
  • Promises that you’ll lose weight and keep it off without giving up fatty foods or starting an exercise program
  • Bases its claims only on “before and after” photos
  • Limits your food choices and encourages you to only eat a specific set or type of food

What are the dangers of fad diets?

Fad diets can lead to things like gout, poor athleticism, heart disease and—ironically—poor, long-term weight-loss control. If you’re looking to get in shape or lose weight this year, you should make lifestyle changes that encourage portion control, exercise more, avoid empty calories and eat a well-balanced diet. Keep in mind that forming healthy dieting practices now will keep you on track with your long-term weight-loss goal.

Avoid Winter Illnesses

Did you know that over 200 different viruses can cause the common cold? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American adults will get two to four colds per year, while children can get between five and 10 annually. The CDC also reports that winter is peak cold season. This should come as no surprise when you think about how many people you see sneezing and coughing during the colder months. Fortunately, you can keep these illnesses at bay and stay healthy with a little effort. Here’s how:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick, and stay away from others when you feel under the weather.
  • Wash your hands often using soap and warm water to protect against germs.
  • Get plenty of sleep, stay physically active and drink plenty of water to keep your immune system strong.
  • Manage your stress, and eat a nutritious diet rich in healthy grains, fruits, vegetables and fiber.
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands aren’t clean.

 

       
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